Physicists observe ‘negative mass’

Neat, and weird…

Physicists have created a fluid with “negative mass”, which accelerates towards you when pushed.

In the everyday world, when an object is pushed, it accelerates in the same direction as the force applied to it; this relationship is described by Isaac Newton’s Second Law of Motion.

But in theory, matter can have negative mass in the same sense that an electric charge can be positive or negative.

Oh; I was hoping ‘negative mass’ could be used for weight loss… 😉

Maple syrup boosts antibiotics

Great news for spring! 🙂

You’d think nothing goes together better than maple syrup and pancakes, but recent research shows there may be a new winning combo: maple syrup and antibiotics. Brand-new, exploratory research performed by—you’ll never guess—a professor in Canada has shown promise in how maple syrup extracts can boost the performance of antibiotics.

Graphene-based sieve turns seawater into drinking water

Great news!

A UK-based team of researchers has created a graphene-based sieve capable of removing salt from seawater.

The sought-after development could aid the millions of people without ready access to clean drinking water.

The promising graphene oxide sieve could be highly efficient at filtering salts, and will now be tested against existing desalination membranes.

It has previously been difficult to manufacture graphene-based barriers on an industrial scale.

Thanks, science: You may be able to get drunk on an alcohol substitute without a hangover next morning

Interesting.

Thanks to science, you may soon be able to get drunk without feeling the effects the next morning.

A British scientist and longtime drug researcher has developed an alcohol substitute that still gives imbibers that sought-after buzz without the unsavoury side effects of a hangover the next day.

I guess he didn’t know there already exists such a thing. 😉

Shorebird’s beak inspires researchers to design new water collection strategy

WINTERY KNIGHT

The shorebird's beak is more interesting than you might think The shorebird’s beak is more interesting than you might think

Dr. Fazale Rana of Reasons to Believe tweeted this cool example of biomimetics from Science Daily.

Excerpt:

A UT Arlington engineering professor and his doctoral student have designed a device based on a shorebird’s beak that can accumulate water collected from fog and dew.

The device could provide water in drought-stricken areas of the world or deserts around the globe.

Xin Heng… a doctoral student in Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, and Cheng Luo, MAE professor, have made a device that can use fog and dew to collect water.

Cheng Luo, professor in the Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering Department, and Xin Heng, PhD candidate in the same College of Engineering department, published “Bioinspired Plate-Based Fog Collectors” in the Aug. 25 edition of ACS’ (American Chemical Society) Applied Materials & Interfaces journal.

The idea began when Heng saw an article that explained…

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