Family in eastern Ontario lives in yurts

Not just for Central Asians or campers

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Architecture Du Jour: The Shaker Style

When I lived in the Capitol District (Albany, NY and the surrounding area), there were Shaker references everywhere; apparently there had been Shakers in the region, back in the day. And I learned about Shaker furniture, gained an appreciation for its beauty, and simplicity. I like Toddy Cat’s theory, in his comment. 😉 Hey, it’s as reasonable an explanation as any other! 🙂

Uncouth Reflections

Blowhard, Esq. writes:

The basic standards that defined both the buildings and their interiors were simplicity and utility. The Shakers frowned on any kind of decoration, and they favored pure, clean forms that were highly functional and economic to make. The house interiors were bright and airy, well-heated and clean, uncluttered and serene.

…As the Shaker movement developed, they began to systematize the layouts of their communities…What enabled the Shaker style to grow and develop was the fact that all unknown artisans involved were able to innovate, providing they held to the group’s essential tenets. “This freedom to experiment in the interest of betterment,” says [design writer Richard] Shepherd, “saved Shaker architecture from the blight of institutionalism or stereotype.”

— Building Without Architects: A Global Guide to Everyday Architecture

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Alf Bunker and the Cherrywood Pickering Railway

From the Pickering Township Historical Society newsletter Pathmaster, Winter Edition Volume 3 Number 2 (2001).

From the Pickering Township Historical Society newsletter Pathmaster, Winter Edition Volume 3 Number 2 (2001), page 15.

Taken in 1964, probably by Alfred H. Bunker, or one of his two sisters, Dorothy Bunker and Ethel Bunker, in their backyard of their orchard, Happy Nook, at Cherrywood, near Pickering, Ontario.

Taken in 1964, probably by Alfred H. Bunker, or one of his two sisters, Dorothy Bunker and Ethel Bunker, in their backyard of their orchard, Happy Nook, at Cherrywood, near Pickering, Ontario.

Taken in 1965, probably by Alfred H. Bunker, or one of his two sisters, Dorothy Bunker and Ethel Bunker, in their backyard of their orchard, Happy Nook, at Cherrywood, near Pickering, Ontario. This photo was within a handmade Christmas card he made, for Christmas 1965. Alf is identified as the President of the Cherrywood Pickering Railway; his sister Dorothy as the Vice-President, and his sister Ethel as the Inspector; the caption for the above photo read, "Here we are {a}waiting orders from Santa Claus".

Taken in 1965, probably by Alfred H. Bunker, or one of his two sisters, Dorothy Bunker and Ethel Bunker, in their backyard of their orchard, Happy Nook, at Cherrywood, near Pickering, Ontario.
This photo was within a handmade Christmas card he made, for Christmas 1965. Alf is identified as the President of the Cherrywood Pickering Railway; his sister Dorothy as the Vice-President, and his sister Ethel as the Inspector; the caption for the above photo read, “Here we are {a}waiting orders from Santa Claus”.