First 3D-printed pill approved by US authorities

Wow!

In a world first, the US Food and Drug Administration has given the go-ahead for a 3D-printed pill to be produced.

The FDA has previously approved medical devices – including prosthetics – that have been 3D printed.

The new drug, dubbed Spritam, was developed by Aprecia Pharmaceuticals to control seizures brought on by epilepsy.

The company said that it planned to develop other medications using its 3D platform.

Printing the drugs allows layers of medication to be packaged more tightly in precise dosages.

A separate technology developed by the firm, known as ZipDose, makes high-dose medications easier to swallow.

Printing the drug meant it could package up to 1,000 milligrams into individual tablets.

The 3D-printed pill dissolves in the same manner as other oral medicines.

Footless Calgary rooster walks again with 3D-printed talons

Is there anything 3D-printing can’t be used for? Gotta love human ingenuity. 🙂

A Calgary bird who lost his feet to frostbite is now walking thanks to a pair of artificial talons created on a 3D printer.

Left with just stumps and unable to walk, Foghorn the footless rooster was discovered earlier this year by the city’s animal and bylaw services.

Dr. Daniel Pang, an assistant professor in the University of Calgary’s Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, wanted to help when heard about the rooster’s condition. Pang’s area of research is in small animal pain and welfare.

“I immediately thought of Dr. Mark Ungrin as I knew he had a 3D printer in his laboratory and he might be able to design and create prosthetic feet for the rooster,” he said in a release.

The two veterinarians put their noggins together and brought in an undergraduate mechanical engineering student to help manufacture the fake feet.

3D-printed jet engine unveiled by Australian researchers

Wow!

Australian researchers have unveiled the world’s first 3D-printed jet engine, a manufacturing breakthrough that could lead to cheaper, lighter and more fuel-efficient jets.

Engineers at Monash University and its commercial arm Amaero Engineering are making top-secret prototypes for Boeing Co, Airbus Group NV, Raytheon Co and Safran SA in a development that could be the saviour of Australia’s struggling manufacturing sector.

Chinese Company Showcases Fully 3D-Printed Villa and Apartment Building

Chinese Company Showcases Fully 3D-Printed Villa and Apartment Building

Neat!

Only a few years ago, if someone had told you that it was possible to build a home without the noisy, dusty eyesore that is the construction site, you’d probably have thought they were crazy. Yet, Chinese company WinSun Decoration Design Engineering Co has made this possible – they’re actually printing homes now, using one of those revolutionary 3D printers.

WinSun made headlines in March last year, when the printed 10 different one-story, 200 square-meter houses, using nothing but industrial construction waste and a 3D printer. Each building cost $4,800 to make. Now, they’re in the news again with two new additions – a five-story apartment building and a 1,100 square meter villa.

Young ‘Star Wars’ fans gets own 3D printed trooper arm

Awesome!

On Saturday afternoon, 7-year-old Liam Porter went to the movies with his friends in Augusta, Georgia.

Shortly after he left the theatre, he spotted Imperial Stormtroopers marching toward him.

A huge fan of the Clone Troopers from Star Wars, Liam was thrilled. 

What he and his family didn’t know was that the troopers were there to surprise Liam with a new 3D-printed prosthetic arm that resembled a Clone Trooper’s arm. Paired with the new arm was a Clone Trooper helmet — and an invitation to join the 501st Legion, a fan organization dedication to wearing accurate Imperial costumes.

“I was just as surprised as he was,” Liam’s mother, Ryan Porter, told WFXG. “I knew it was going to happen, but i didn’t know exactly what was planned.”

Extinct giant penguin found in shed

A bird that would have towered above today’s largest species is rediscovered thanks to 3D printing.

A giant penguin that would have towered above today’s largest species has been discovered in a New Zealand university’s storage shed, it’s been reported.

The fossilised bones of the as-yet unnamed bird had remained in storage at Auckland University since 1971, until the advent of 3D printing helped experts confirm that it was “almost certainly” a new type of giant penguin, Radio New Zealand International reports. The new technology meant that Dr Daniel Thomas was able to scan the bones to an American palaeontologist, and they were able to determine the bird would have stood at least 30cm taller than an emperor penguin, and taller than the extinct Kairuku penguin, whose remains were identified in 2012. “I imagine an emperor would have run away scared,” Dr Thomas said, pointing out that he was still unsure if the 4ft 3in (1.3m) specimen was a juvenile or an adult.